Browsed by
Category: Moving

How to Move Cross-Country with a Cat

How to Move Cross-Country with a Cat

Moving is an ordeal when you’re moving cross-country. There are a lot of logistics to organize. It can be even more stressful if you have an animal with you, especially a cat, who isn’t used to being out and about. I recently moved from Wisconsin to Washington state with my cat, Hazel, in tow. I am very lucky that Hazel is an incredibly chill cat, but there were still a lot of things to think about when I was getting ready. Here are the things I prepared while moving.

Supplies

Most cats don’t like cars, so I suggest getting some sort of carrier for your cat. I got a medium-sized dog kennel from Amazon, so she would have room to move around. You know what your own cat likes, so if they need something bigger or smaller get that. I put in a bed, litter box, and water for her. The litter box is a travel version and was so small and portable. It saved my life because I could easily move it between the car and the hotel. I also got a water bowl that screws to the side of the kennel, so it wouldn’t spill accidentally. (affiliate links)

She tried to climb out the top of her kennel on the last day.

Be Prepared for Crying

Cats are notorious for this. They will whine for HOURS and just when you think they must be tired, they will keep going. I was so, so lucky that Hazel didn’t start crying until our last day of travel and even then it was minimal. I have heard of people putting a blanket around their cat kennel to muffle the noises. I was prepared to turn up the music loud to drown her out. There are also some calming cat sprays that have pheromones that cats like, they might help your cat not be so on edge. (affiliate link)

Hotels

Look ahead to see which hotels have the cheapest pet fees. I found that they were around $15-$25 on top of the room fee. If you are around the Dakotas area, Kelly Inn has no pet fees. I stayed there two nights and I loved it.  I brought in my cat’s food, scratching post, bed, and litter box, which I put in the bathroom so it would be easiest for the staff to clean. Think about what will be the best for your cat. If they retaliate by going to the bathroom where they shouldn’t, maybe keep them in the bathroom. If they like to scratch a lot, bring in multiple scratching posts to encourage correct scratching. They will love getting out of the car, Hazel was so excited and explored everything.

Hazel insisted on sitting near to me, so I rearranged her kennel.

Weather

It was in the 90s my entire drive out to Washington. It was stifling. To keep Hazel cool, I made sure she was never in the sun even when I was driving. When we stopped quickly for gas, I opened all the windows. The few times when we stopped for a longer period of time, I opened all my car doors, so there would be a cross breeze in the car. I also watched to see if she started panting, as that would be a sign she was too hot (it takes a lot to get a cat to pant.) In the winter, I would be sure to put a blanket on her cage if I was going to be gone for more than a few minutes.

The number one thing to remember is the personality of your cat. You know what they can and cannot handle and how best to soothe them (to the extent they will let you.) If you can afford it, there are services that will move your pet for you, just make sure to do your research. It was stressful but definitely worth it to bring my cat with me on my big move. And to think, there were people who told me to leave her behind (as if!) If you have any other tips, please leave them in the comments! Or let me know how your trip went.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

On Moving

On Moving

I’ve done it! I’ve been talking about it for months and months and now it has finally happened: I live in Washington state!

My uncle and I set out on Saturday, July 29th. The outside temperature was around 90 for the whole drive. Even with that, it was a good trip overall. The vast expanses of North Dakota and Montana were breath taking and the mountains in Montana, Idaho, and Washington were extraordinary. We arrived on Tuesday, August 1st, right on schedule. I’m so very excited for this new chapter in my life.

I have to be honest though, leaving was so hard. I cried when I left my best friend and roommate in Madison, when I hugged my mom goodbye, and when I crossed the state line out of Wisconsin. However, I never cried because I didn’t want to go or because I thought I was making a mistake.

Logically, I know that I’m capable of living on my own in a new place. Now I get to see that idea in action. I need to be open to new things and willing to actually talk to other people (eek!). I need to know when to ask for help and when I can do it myself. Most of all, I need to be comfortable in who I am and live a life according to that.

I didn’t mean for this post to get so philosophical, but these are all interesting things to think about and remember. If you are thinking of a life changing move, do it. I’m already so happy I did. If you want to chat, comment or hit me up on social media. Please let me know what you think!

Save

Save

4 Tips for Selling on Craig’s List

4 Tips for Selling on Craig’s List

In three weeks, I’m going to be moving from Wisconsin to Washington state. I realized very early on that I could not bring all of my furniture with me and I would have to sell most of it. But selling items is not as easy as it would seem. There are certain things you need to include in your Craig’s List posts to boost the likelihood of your item selling. Here are my top four tips for selling on Craig’s List. 

#1 Clear Pictures

There are a few components in my picture above that help it to stand out. The lighting is bright, the couch looks clean, and there aren’t very many distractions in the picture. It can be even easier to take a good picture when it’s easier to move the item around. Find a blank wall or a door to put the item in front of and turn on as many lights as you can. Even better, take the picture near a window on a sunny day. All of these help to boost your pictures and make your item look more appealing. More people will be willing to click on it.

#2 Priced Right

I knew that the couches I was trying to sell were a little worse for wear. In the picture above, you can see a little bit of damage on it and there is normal wear and tear as well. I knew I wouldn’t be receiving top dollar for it. So, I priced it at $200 with the hope that I could get $150 for it. You can also look at the pricing for similar items on Craig’s List before you list your own to be more competitive.

#3 Descriptive Description

Descriptions are really hard to write, however, there are a few things you can include pretty much every time. Include the dimensions of the product, since pictures often don’t do justice to sizing. If there are significant advantages or disadvantages to the item include them as well. If the item is large (like mine), state whether you are willing to help move the object or if the buyer needs to have their own transportation.If you put this information in, it will help scale down inquiries to the people who are really serious about buying your item.

#4 Lower the Price

If after a few days or a week, your item isn’t selling, lower the price. If my couch doesn’t sell at $200 after a week, I’ll lower to $100. It’s more important for me to sell it than it is for me to make a lot of money off of it. If you have the time, lower the price more slowly and try to find the “sweet spot” to get to most money someone will pay.

I sold my couches less than a week after I posted them. And the woman who came to get them said “This is exactly what I was expecting.” I makes me feel a lot better that I don’t need to find a way to get them to Goodwill. If you have any of your own tips for selling on Craig’s List, please reply in the comments. I hope these are helpful for you selling endeavors.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

My Moving Timeline

My Moving Timeline

In just 7 weeks, I’m moving from Wisconsin to Washington state. I have so much to do in this time. From the job search to the apartment hunt, it’s really a never ending list. Part of that is getting my things ready to be moved across the country and I only have my Honda Fit and a 5′ x 8′ trailer to do so. Basically, the plan is to purge most of my things (which I’m basically done with), sell anything worth value, and pack the rest as concisely as I can. I’m sweating a little bit just thinking about getting all of this done. Luckily, I’m a  list and timeline driven person, so I’ve parsed this process down to smaller steps.


Purging

After I moved across town in August of 2016, I knew that I had way too much stuff. So, I decided to get rid of or upgrade as much of it as I could. It was a pretty big endevour that was spread over five months. Someday I’ll write a post on it, but for now know that I severally cut down on the amount of stuff I own. Here are the things leftover for my move:

 

  • Purge Pots and Pans on Lazy Susan
  • Decide Which Guitar Music to Keep and Which to Donate
  • Scan All Documents in my File Box
  • Purge Drawers of Desk
  • Purge Inbox on Desk
  • Clean Balcony
  • Purge Storage Closet

 


Selling

I think this will be the most gratifying of all of these. I got quite a few bulky pieces of furniture over the years and I am not moving them all the way across the country. Especially, when I can buy similar pieces once I get to Washington. My hope is that the money garnered from these pieces will help me to pay for necessary expenses such as my security and cat deposits. I broke this one out by time frame and I cross my fingers that 4 weeks on Craig’s List is enough time to sell everything. Anything leftover at the end of July will go to Goodwill.

June 3rd-14th
  • Clean All Items (Vacuum, Dust, Touch Up Paint)
  • Repair All Items (Stitch Holes, Tighten Screws)
June 15th-23rd
  • Take Pictures of Small Items (Lamps, End Tables, Printer, etc.)
  • Take Pictures of Large Items (Couches, Dining Table, etc.)
June 24th
  • Post Items on Facebook (Easier to sell to friends, right?)
July 1st
  • List Items on Craig’s List

Packing

This is the BIG one! And the one I have struggled with the most in the past. Usually my plans start out really well and then somewhere in the middle they break down, which results in a mad dash the day before moving to get everything packed. I think that having less things will help with this. I’m also buying all my supplies a few weeks in advance and keeping them all in one place for ease of use.

4 Weeks: July 1st-7th
  • Wall Decor
  • Knick Knacks and Fragile Items
  • Books (use small boxes)
  • DVDs and VHS’s
  • Storage Closet
  • Balcony
3 Weeks: July 8th-14th
  • Coat Closet
  • Under China Cabinet
  • Under Bed
  • Hall Closet
  • Non-Essential Shoes
2 Weeks: July 15th-21st
  • Bathroom
  • Non-Essential Kitchen
  • Non-Essential Dresser
  • Desk Drawers
  • Nightstand
1 Week: July 22nd-26th
  • Overnight Bag
  • First to Unpack
  • Rest of Dresser
  • Non-Refrigerated Food
  • Rest of Kitchen
  • Rest of Shoes
  • Miscellaneous
2 Days: July 27th
  • Take Drawers / Shelves Out of Everything
  • Plants
  • Cat Stuff
  • Hanging Clothes
  • Computer
  • Television
Day Of: July 29th
  • Pack Any Last Minute Items

 

That is a pretty exhaustive list. (Seriously, I’ve been staring around my house for days trying to think of everything.) I’ll update you once I’ve moved whether my plan worked to make this move as stress-less as possible. For now, I’m going to get started on packing and selling all of my things and praying that it will all fit. Do you have an moving suggestions? I’d love to hear them.

Save

Save

 

Save

I’m Moving to Washington State!

I’m Moving to Washington State!

You read that right! I’m moving to Olympia, Washington at the very end of July. I’ve already told my family and my job and now I’m telling the rest of my people.

Mt. Rainier National Park

A lot of people have asked me why I chose Washington as the place I want to live. There are a lot of reasons. It’s a gorgeous state and one of my best friends lives there along with her husband and one of my cousins lives there as well. I’ve visited six times over four years and have loved it every time.

Probably the biggest reason, though, is the travel opportunities. There are just so many cool places to go in the Pacific Northwest. Seattle and Portland are fun to visit. There are multiple national and state parks; there’s the ocean. I could keep going. Also, I have wanted to move here for a very long time, and now I have no reasons not to follow this pull in my heart.

Sunset over the Pacific Ocean

I have to say that I feel a lot of emotions about leaving. I’m excited to have this completely new experience and learn what I’m really made of, completely by myself. I’m also terrified that I’m going to fail, that I’m going to hate living there, that I’m going to be lonely. I’m stressed about getting all of my things and my cat there in one piece (not to mention my sanity.) I’m worried that I’m running head first into a mistake.

But at the end of the day, I know I’m going to be proud of myself for doing this. I am going to be able to look back at this time in my life and know that I didn’t miss out on anything. I took the chances that were important to me and I’ll own whatever comes as my own.

Seattle Space Needle

If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment or go to any of my social media accounts. Thanks!

Save

What to Pack in Your First-To-Unpack Box

What to Pack in Your First-To-Unpack Box

Moving is an extremely stressful experience whether you are moving within the same city or across the country. The worst thing is when you think of something specific you need when it is packed away in a mountain of boxes. It can be easy to remember your phone, keys, and wallet, but what over items should be in easy reach when you’re moving?

Toilet Paper and Soap

Often when you move into a new location, there will be absolutely no amenities waiting there for you. I have personally gone to the bathroom in a new apartment and realized I had no toilet paper; it wasn’t pleasant. I would suggest that toilet paper and soap be the first items you unpack, even before you start bring other boxes and furniture in the house. This way you and your moving crew have access to at least one usable bathroom and don’t have to “air dry” like I had to.

Tool Bag

There are always going to be items you have that need to be taken apart in some way before transport. For instance, I almost forgot that the legs for my very large couches needed to be taken off before they could be moved from my last apartment. I was really glad that I had carefully packed my tool bag in my first-to-unpack box. Having your tools accessible while you move is important because you never know when you are going to need a screw driver or a needle nose pliers.

Cleaning Supplies

Let’s be honest, sometimes when you move into a new place it’s not the cleanliest place. If you have cleaning supplies readily available it’s easy to quickly clean before you bring in your boxes and furniture. It can also feel nice to give your new home a spruce within the first few days to make it feel more homey.

Miscellaneous 

There are always going to be little things you want to have that are specific to you and your move. For instance, I always need to pack supplies for my cat in an easily accessible place. People with children will have other things that are important to keep handy. Extension cords and power strips are also something that could go in a first-to-unpack box. It all depends on your needs.
Every thing you can do to make moving a little bit easier is worth it. Creating a box that is easily accessible filled with things useful to you, is a way to help yourself while moving. What are some of the things you would pack in this box? Do you have any other moving tips?

Save

Save

5 Helpful Health Apps

5 Helpful Health Apps

If you are like me, you have a lot of things in your life you would like to keep track of. Probably the most important is our health, which is also the thing we most likely let slide. I’ve put together a list of five apps that can make keeping track of our health a little bit easier.
1. Runkeeper, Free
This is an app that tracks your mileage, whether it be running, walking, hiking, or cycling.I really like this app because it is simple to use and it also has a website. There are a variety of cool features, but my favorite is making routes. I can see where I’m supposed to be going while I’m on my run instead of having to memorize directions.
2. Pacer, Free
There has been a recent craze of wearable step trackers, but if you want a simpler option of tracking your steps then Pacer is a good app to do that. It runs in the background of your phone and is simple to use. It has challenges and graphs as well. My favorite part is being able to see your friends’ step count. I used this before I got my FitBit.

If you want to track your food intake, My Fitness Pal is the best app I have found. They have a variety of food choices and the interface is very user friendly. They also have an online component, so you don’t always need to use the app. I really like the ability to add my workouts in to get a better feel of my calorie usage.

4. Sleep Cycle, $0.99
This is the only app on this list that isn’t free, but it’s well worth it.
This tracks your sleep and has an alarm that will wake you up at the end of your sleep cycle so you can wake up refreshed. It also has a variety of other data to help you get the most out of your sleep.
5. Glow, Free
This one is for all the ladies out there. This is the simplest app I have found to help you track your period. It has a simple interface and so many different things you can track. Glow can also function as a fertility estimator. My favorite part is tracking period symptoms like tender breasts and cramping.
It can be really hard to stay healthy and track all the necessary information to do so. These are some of the best apps I have found to be able to do that. Please tell me what you think or name some of your favorite health apps.

Save

Save

How to Create a Running Training Plan

How to Create a Running Training Plan

4-scope-it-out-1
My friend and I at the Scope It Out 5k in August of 2015.

I ran my first 5k in May of 2015. It was the first race in my self-imposed challenge of running 12 5ks in 12 months (I ended up with 13 5ks in 14 months. Hooray). It was during this time that I learned the importance of not only showing up ready to race, but preparing for the race by having a regimented training plan.

Especially if you are running your first race, you should have a plan of attack when it comes to preparing. This guide will help you come up with a workable training plan that fits into your life.

screen-shot-2016-11-02-at-9-06-10-pm

1. Research Existing Plans

There are a plethora of sample training plans on Pintrest, which makes it an excellent place to get an idea of how a training plan should look based on number of weeks, type of race, and how many days a week you would like to run. Use these examples as your starting point and build a personal plan around them. When I plan for 5ks, I usually have my plans last about six weeks and I set out to run three days a week. These numbers will vary depending on how much you want to push yourself and what type of race you’re running.

screen-shot-2016-11-02-at-9-41-34-pm

2. Look at Your Calendar

After you’ve decided the structure of your plan, it’s important to look at your calendar during that timeline. Are there any holidays or birthdays during this time? Do you have any travel plans? Are there any foreseeable obstacles in your schedule? It’s important to plan around these events. If you know that there is no way that you’ll be able to run on your husband’s birthday, then plan that day as a rest day or a light workout day. Also look if there are days of the week that are particularly busy for you and plan your workout accordingly. This will save you from disaster as you go through your training plan.

dscn6852

3. Create Training Plan

There are three parts to a training plan: running days, rest days, and cross-train days. Running days are days you run. I usually mark how many miles or minutes I want to run on a particular day. This usually gets longer as the plan goes on. Rest days are days you rest. This is a really important part of training and allows your body to recuperate. Cross-train days are the days that you don’t run, but you still workout. This can include a lot of different workouts. Weight training, biking, swimming, yoga, or any number of physical activities can be scheduled on cross-train days.

At the end, you should have a clear map of what is expected each week during your training. You can schedule as tightly or as loosely as you are comfortable with, just make sure that the plan gives you room to succeed.

word072715-775x450

4. Don’t Get Discouraged by Missed Days

Remember as you’re training, you can change the plan as you see fit. You can move workouts around; you can miss workouts. The important thing is keeping the plan going. If you miss a day, pick up where you left off or reschedule a rest day to make up for a day you missed. As long as you keep moving forward, you are making progress.

Below, I have a picture of my training schedule for the 5k I’m running in December. I made it while I made this post! If you want to keep up with me and my runs, I have a Runkeeper account. Otherwise, please tell me how your training plans go or if you have any pointers!

untitled-2
I always have plans on Wednesday so it’s always a rest day. Also, Thanksgiving falls during Week 4, so I have three rest days in a row. This makes it a lot easier for me to stay on track!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save